IRAQ, Terrorism in Kirkuk

A man approx 30 years walks out of his home in his djellaba cloths,still sleepy , hearing the sound of cars.
<br>Few seconds later an anti-terror team take him back inside his house and hit him with their Kalashnikov before final arrest.
<br>&quothe tried to kill a policeman a week before".
Kirkuk
A small town between baghad and kirkuk is surrounded during nighttime.
Kirkuk
A small village between Kirkuk and Bahgdad is surrounded by Anti-terror forces. all local men are driver into the local school and armed stay on roof to control anyone who is trying to escape, while wailting for sunlight.<br><br>Kirkuk, 200 miles north of Baghdad, lies in the middle of God's sand box. A seemingly endless stream of small hills stretch to her grey and unfinished suburbs. Kirkuk is a city of grey bricks, dusty roads bordered with litter, corrugated iron roofs and low hanging knots of electrical wires. Under this poor and unpromising looking surface lies 13 percent of Iraq's known oil reserves. All the problems of Iraq meet in this city of about one million souls. Before the invasion, Kurds, Turkmens, Arabs and Christians lived together in relative harmony. But the dawning democracy and rich oil fields attract many 'dark hands' from afar. <br>Oil has a firm grip over Kirkuk. Saddam imported thousands of Arabs from the South to control the oil reserves. They took over the houses of Kurds and Turkmen who were forced to flee. But the Arabs are now leaving (some 11.000 Arabs left Kirkuk in 2008). The Kurds conquered the city side by side with the Americans in 2003 and now form the majority. They want Kirkuk to be part of their own autonomous region of Kurdistan, as it once was. But the central government in Baghdad is not letting Kirkuk go. Kirkuk became a disputed area and will not vote in the coming elections at the end of January. <br>
Kirkuk, hunting for terrorists in god's sandbox
Howard Keegan, team leader of the Kirkuk Provincial Reconstruction Team, steps out. <br>His mission is to support the fragile democracy by listening to the man in the street, even if the man in the street needs a little push in the back to talk to him. The battle against terrorism is left to the Iraqi's.<br><br>Kirkuk, 200 miles north of Baghdad, lies in the middle of God's sand box. A seemingly endless stream of small hills stretch to her grey and unfinished suburbs. Kirkuk is a city of grey bricks, dusty roads bordered with litter, corrugated iron roofs and low hanging knots of electrical wires. Under this poor and unpromising looking surface lies 13 percent of Iraq's known oil reserves. All the problems of Iraq meet in this city of about one million souls. Before the invasion, Kurds, Turkmens, Arabs and Christians lived together in relative harmony. But the dawning democracy and rich oil fields attract many 'dark hands' from afar. <br>Oil has a firm grip over Kirkuk. Saddam imported thousands of Arabs from the South to control the oil reserves. They took over the houses of Kurds and Turkmen who were forced to flee. But the Arabs are now leaving (some 11.000 Arabs left Kirkuk in 2008). The Kurds conquered the city side by side with the Americans in 2003 and now form the majority. They want Kirkuk to be part of their own autonomous region of Kurdistan, as it once was. But the central government in Baghdad is not letting Kirkuk go. Kirkuk became a disputed area and will not vote in the coming elections at the end of January. <br>Yet, in spite of the political hassle, the Kirkukis still get along. They have intermarried and live in the same streets. The Turkmen green-grocer stands next to his Kurdish colleague at the bazaar where I buy my oranges. But violence has increased since the fall of Saddam. <br><br>
Kirkuk, daily life in a split city Kirkuk, daily life in a split
Anti terrorist units seach houses for weapons.<br><br>Kirkuk, 200 miles north of Baghdad, lies in the middle of God's sand box. A seemingly endless stream of small hills stretch to her grey and unfinished suburbs. Kirkuk is a city of grey bricks, dusty roads bordered with litter, corrugated iron roofs and low hanging knots of electrical wires. Under this poor and unpromising looking surface lies 13 percent of Iraq's known oil reserves. All the problems of Iraq meet in this city of about one million souls. Before the invasion, Kurds, Turkmens, Arabs and Christians lived together in relative harmony. But the dawning democracy and rich oil fields attract many 'dark hands' from afar. <br>Oil has a firm grip over Kirkuk. Saddam imported thousands of Arabs from the South to control the oil reserves. They took over the houses of Kurds and Turkmen who were forced to flee. But the Arabs are now leaving (some 11.000 Arabs left Kirkuk in 2008). The Kurds conquered the city side by side with the Americans in 2003 and now form the majority. They want Kirkuk to be part of their own autonomous region of Kurdistan, as it once was. But the central government in Baghdad is not letting Kirkuk go. Kirkuk became a disputed area and will not vote in the coming elections at the end of January. <br>Yet, in spite of the political hassle, the Kirkukis still get along. They have intermarried and live in the same streets. The Turkmen green-grocer stands next to his Kurdish colleague at the bazaar where I buy my oranges. But violence has increased since the fall of Saddam. <br>
Kirkuk Kirkuk, daily life in a split city
At the earliest light, Iraqi anti-terror brigate enters the villages and inspect house by house.
Kirkuk
A red hairy young man has been arrested during a raid by anti terror forces.he was one of the main targets this night,suspected to be responsable for kidnapping , bomb attacks and murder.<br><br>Kirkuk, 200 miles north of Baghdad, lies in the middle of God's sand box. A seemingly endless stream of small hills stretch to her grey and unfinished suburbs. Kirkuk is a city of grey bricks, dusty roads bordered with litter, corrugated iron roofs and low hanging knots of electrical wires. Under this poor and unpromising looking surface lies 13 percent of Iraq's known oil reserves. All the problems of Iraq meet in this city of about one million souls. Before the invasion, Kurds, Turkmens, Arabs and Christians lived together in relative harmony. But the dawning democracy and rich oil fields attract many 'dark hands' from afar. <br>Oil has a firm grip over Kirkuk. Saddam imported thousands of Arabs from the South to control the oil reserves. They took over the houses of Kurds and Turkmen who were forced to flee. But the Arabs are now leaving (some 11.000 Arabs left Kirkuk in 2008). The Kurds conquered the city side by side with the Americans in 2003 and now form the majority. They want Kirkuk to be part of their own autonomous region of Kurdistan, as it once was. But the central government in Baghdad is not letting Kirkuk go. Kirkuk became a disputed area and will not vote in the coming elections at the end of January.
Kirkuk, hunting for terrorists in gods sandbox
In the villages weapons are found, some with the numbers of Saddams army on it.<br> Since it is a remote area, locals are armed and difficult to control.<br><br>Kirkuk, 200 miles north of Baghdad, lies in the middle of God's sand box. A seemingly endless stream of small hills stretch to her grey and unfinished suburbs. Kirkuk is a city of grey bricks, dusty roads bordered with litter, corrugated iron roofs and low hanging knots of electrical wires. Under this poor and unpromising looking surface lies 13 percent of Iraq's known oil reserves. All the problems of Iraq meet in this city of about one million souls. Before the invasion, Kurds, Turkmens, Arabs and Christians lived together in relative harmony. But the dawning democracy and rich oil fields attract many 'dark hands' from afar. <br>Oil has a firm grip over Kirkuk. Saddam imported thousands of Arabs from the South to control the oil reserves. They took over the houses of Kurds and Turkmen who were forced to flee. But the Arabs are now leaving (some 11.000 Arabs left Kirkuk in 2008). The Kurds conquered the city side by side with the Americans in 2003 and now form the majority. They want Kirkuk to be part of their own autonomous region of Kurdistan, as it once was. But the central government in Baghdad is not letting Kirkuk go. Kirkuk became a disputed area and will not vote in the coming elections at the end of January.
Kirkuk, hunting for terrorists in god's sandbox
Sweepers clean the streets in Kirkuk, because they move through different area's of town,they hide their faces.<br><br>Kirkuk, 200 miles north of Baghdad, lies in the middle of God's sand box. A seemingly endless stream of small hills stretch to her grey and unfinished suburbs. Kirkuk is a city of grey bricks, dusty roads bordered with litter, corrugated iron roofs and low hanging knots of electrical wires. Under this poor and unpromising looking surface lies 13 percent of Iraq's known oil reserves. All the problems of Iraq meet in this city of about one million souls. Before the invasion, Kurds, Turkmens, Arabs and Christians lived together in relative harmony. But the dawning democracy and rich oil fields attract many 'dark hands' from afar. <br>Oil has a firm grip over Kirkuk. Saddam imported thousands of Arabs from the South to control the oil reserves. They took over the houses of Kurds and Turkmen who were forced to flee. But the Arabs are now leaving (some 11.000 Arabs left Kirkuk in 2008). The Kurds conquered the city side by side with the Americans in 2003 and now form the majority. They want Kirkuk to be part of their own autonomous region of Kurdistan, as it once was. But the central government in Baghdad is not letting Kirkuk go. Kirkuk became a disputed area and will not vote in the coming elections at the end of January. <br>Yet, in spite of the political hassle, the Kirkukis still get along. They have intermarried and live in the same streets. The Turkmen green-grocer stands next to his Kurdish colleague at the bazaar where I buy my oranges. But violence has increased since the fall of Saddam. <br>
Kirkuk Kirkuk, daily life in a split city
At the earliest light, Iraqi anti-terror brigate enters the remote villages and inspect house by house.
Kirkuk
Kirkuk Kirkuk, daily life in a split city<br>refugees who left their homes around kirkuk during the war in 2003 still live in the emty stadion at the edge of Kirkuk.<br>Their homes have been claimed by other people and they cannot return.<br><br>Kirkuk, 200 miles north of Baghdad, lies in the middle of God's sand box. A seemingly endless stream of small hills stretch to her grey and unfinished suburbs. Kirkuk is a city of grey bricks, dusty roads bordered with litter, corrugated iron roofs and low hanging knots of electrical wires. Under this poor and unpromising looking surface lies 13 percent of Iraq's known oil reserves. All the problems of Iraq meet in this city of about one million souls. Before the invasion, Kurds, Turkmens, Arabs and Christians lived together in relative harmony. But the dawning democracy and rich oil fields attract many 'dark hands' from afar. <br>Oil has a firm grip over Kirkuk. Saddam imported thousands of Arabs from the South to control the oil reserves. They took over the houses of Kurds and Turkmen who were forced to flee. But the Arabs are now leaving (some 11.000 Arabs left Kirkuk in 2008). The Kurds conquered the city side by side with the Americans in 2003 and now form the majority. They want Kirkuk to be part of their own autonomous region of Kurdistan, as it once was. But the central government in Baghdad is not letting Kirkuk go. Kirkuk became a disputed area and will not vote in the coming elections at the end of January. <br>Yet, in spite of the political hassle, the Kirkukis still get along. They have intermarried and live in the same streets. The Turkmen green-grocer stands next to his Kurdish colleague at the bazaar where I buy my oranges. But violence has increased since the fall of Saddam. <br>
Kirkuk Kirkuk, daily life in a split city
When inspecting the region, sometimes American helicopters are used to avoid people to escape.
Kirkuk
During night time, two old people wake up chocked by a anti terrorist team.<br><br>Kirkuk, 200 miles north of Baghdad, lies in the middle of God's sand box. A seemingly endless stream of small hills stretch to her grey and unfinished suburbs. Kirkuk is a city of grey bricks, dusty roads bordered with litter, corrugated iron roofs and low hanging knots of electrical wires. Under this poor and unpromising looking surface lies 13 percent of Iraq's known oil reserves. All the problems of Iraq meet in this city of about one million souls. Before the invasion, Kurds, Turkmens, Arabs and Christians lived together in relative harmony. But the dawning democracy and rich oil fields attract many 'dark hands' from afar. <br>Oil has a firm grip over Kirkuk. Saddam imported thousands of Arabs from the South to control the oil reserves. They took over the houses of Kurds and Turkmen who were forced to flee. But the Arabs are now leaving (some 11.000 Arabs left Kirkuk in 2008). The Kurds conquered the city side by side with the Americans in 2003 and now form the majority. They want Kirkuk to be part of their own autonomous region of Kurdistan, as it once was. But the central government in Baghdad is not letting Kirkuk go. Kirkuk became a disputed area and will not vote in the coming elections at the end of January. <br>Yet, in spite of the political hassle, the Kirkukis still get along. They have intermarried and live in the same streets. The Turkmen green-grocer stands next to his Kurdish colleague at the bazaar where I buy my oranges. But violence has increased since the fall of Saddam. <br>
Kirkuk Kirkuk, daily life in a split city
When one of the suspected terrorists gives names to the Anti-terror brigades, part of the convoy take action to find any other suspects.
Kirkuk
Us army gards of Howard Keegan, team leader of the Kirkuk Provincial Reconstruction Team are outside to secure the store while he is inside.<br>His goal is to support the fragile democracy,<br> The battle against terrorism is left to the Iraqi's.<br><br>Kirkuk, 200 miles north of Baghdad, lies in the middle of God's sand box. A seemingly endless stream of small hills stretch to her grey and unfinished suburbs. Kirkuk is a city of grey bricks, dusty roads bordered with litter, corrugated iron roofs and low hanging knots of electrical wires. Under this poor and unpromising looking surface lies 13 percent of Iraq's known oil reserves. All the problems of Iraq meet in this city of about one million souls. Before the invasion, Kurds, Turkmens, Arabs and Christians lived together in relative harmony. But the dawning democracy and rich oil fields attract many 'dark hands' from afar. <br>Oil has a firm grip over Kirkuk. Saddam imported thousands of Arabs from the South to control the oil reserves. They took over the houses of Kurds and Turkmen who were forced to flee. But the Arabs are now leaving (some 11.000 Arabs left Kirkuk in 2008). The Kurds conquered the city side by side with the Americans in 2003 and now form the majority. They want Kirkuk to be part of their own autonomous region of Kurdistan, as it once was. But the central government in Baghdad is not letting Kirkuk go. Kirkuk became a disputed area and will not vote in the coming elections at the end of January. <br>Yet, in spite of the political hassle, the Kirkukis still get along. They have intermarried and live in the same streets. The Turkmen green-grocer stands next to his Kurdish colleague at the bazaar where I buy my oranges. But violence has increased since the fall of Saddam.
Kirkuk, a devided city
Joy between the pressure, youngsters enjoy themsleves during a wednseday afternoon close to the center of the city.<br>According to human rights organisation is the police mainly interested in arresting the terrorists, while unemployment among young people is one of the main reasons to get involved in terrorism.<br><br>Kirkuk, 200 miles north of Baghdad, lies in the middle of God's sand box. A seemingly endless stream of small hills stretch to her grey and unfinished suburbs. Kirkuk is a city of grey bricks, dusty roads bordered with litter, corrugated iron roofs and low hanging knots of electrical wires. Under this poor and unpromising looking surface lies 13 percent of Iraq's known oil reserves. All the problems of Iraq meet in this city of about one million souls. Before the invasion, Kurds, Turkmens, Arabs and Christians lived together in relative harmony. But the dawning democracy and rich oil fields attract many 'dark hands' from afar. <br>Oil has a firm grip over Kirkuk. Saddam imported thousands of Arabs from the South to control the oil reserves. They took over the houses of Kurds and Turkmen who were forced to flee. But the Arabs are now leaving (some 11.000 Arabs left Kirkuk in 2008). The Kurds conquered the city side by side with the Americans in 2003 and now form the majority. They want Kirkuk to be part of their own autonomous region of Kurdistan, as it once was. But the central government in Baghdad is not letting Kirkuk go. Kirkuk became a disputed area and will not vote in the coming elections at the end of January. <br>Yet, in spite of the political hassle, the Kirkukis still get along. They have intermarried and live in the same streets. The Turkmen green-grocer stands next to his Kurdish colleague at the bazaar where I buy my oranges. But violence has increased since the fall of Saddam. <br>
Kirkuk Kirkuk, daily life in a split city
refugees who left their homes around kirkuk during the war in 2003 still live in the emty stadion at the edge of Kirkuk.<br>Their homes have been claimed by other people and they cannot return.<br><br>Kirkuk, 200 miles north of Baghdad, lies in the middle of God's sand box. A seemingly endless stream of small hills stretch to her grey and unfinished suburbs. Kirkuk is a city of grey bricks, dusty roads bordered with litter, corrugated iron roofs and low hanging knots of electrical wires. Under this poor and unpromising looking surface lies 13 percent of Iraq's known oil reserves. All the problems of Iraq meet in this city of about one million souls. Before the invasion, Kurds, Turkmens, Arabs and Christians lived together in relative harmony. But the dawning democracy and rich oil fields attract many 'dark hands' from afar. <br>Oil has a firm grip over Kirkuk. Saddam imported thousands of Arabs from the South to control the oil reserves. They took over the houses of Kurds and Turkmen who were forced to flee. But the Arabs are now leaving (some 11.000 Arabs left Kirkuk in 2008). The Kurds conquered the city side by side with the Americans in 2003 and now form the majority. They want Kirkuk to be part of their own autonomous region of Kurdistan, as it once was. But the central government in Baghdad is not letting Kirkuk go. Kirkuk became a disputed area and will not vote in the coming elections at the end of January. <br>Yet, in spite of the political hassle, the Kirkukis still get along. They have intermarried and live in the same streets. The Turkmen green-grocer stands next to his Kurdish colleague at the bazaar where I buy my oranges. But violence has increased since the fall of Saddam. <br>
Kirkuk Kirkuk, daily life in a split city
During the first part of 2008, at least kidnappings took place, the police arrested two man who kidnapped a 14 year old Turkmen girl, they ran into a checkpoint in their volkswagen Passat and got captured. the 3e person made a silent weapon and planned an attack.
Kirkuk
One of the most dangerous streets in the so called &quotAruba&quotdistrict.<br>3 policemen were killed by a roadside bomb.
Kirkuk
Kirkuk<br>One of the most dangerous streets in the so called &quotAruba&quotdistrict.<br>3 policemen were killed by a roadside bomb.<br><br>Kirkuk, 200 miles north of Baghdad, lies in the middle of God's sand box. A seemingly endless stream of small hills stretch to her grey and unfinished suburbs. Kirkuk is a city of grey bricks, dusty roads bordered with litter, corrugated iron roofs and low hanging knots of electrical wires. Under this poor and unpromising looking surface lies 13 percent of Iraq's known oil reserves. All the problems of Iraq meet in this city of about one million souls. Before the invasion, Kurds, Turkmens, Arabs and Christians lived together in relative harmony. But the dawning democracy and rich oil fields attract many 'dark hands' from afar. <br>Oil has a firm grip over Kirkuk. Saddam imported thousands of Arabs from the South to control the oil reserves. They took over the houses of Kurds and Turkmen who were forced to flee. But the Arabs are now leaving (some 11.000 Arabs left Kirkuk in 2008). The Kurds conquered the city side by side with the Americans in 2003 and now form the majority. They want Kirkuk to be part of their own autonomous region of Kurdistan, as it once was. But the central government in Baghdad is not letting Kirkuk go. Kirkuk became a disputed area and will not vote in the coming elections at the end of January. <br>Yet, in spite of the political hassle, the Kirkukis still get along. They have intermarried and live in the same streets. The Turkmen green-grocer stands next to his Kurdish colleague at the bazaar where I buy my oranges. But violence has increased since the fall of Saddam. <br>
Kirkuk Kirkuk, daily life in a split city
A man is stopped by police while shooting at another car with 2 adults bringing 2 children to school.<br>A few minutes later the gunman is allowed to leave with his loaded waepon.
Kirkuk
patrouilles go throught the city trying to secure  the area's.<br><br>Kirkuk, 200 miles north of Baghdad, lies in the middle of God's sand box. A seemingly endless stream of small hills stretch to her grey and unfinished suburbs. Kirkuk is a city of grey bricks, dusty roads bordered with litter, corrugated iron roofs and low hanging knots of electrical wires. Under this poor and unpromising looking surface lies 13 percent of Iraq's known oil reserves. All the problems of Iraq meet in this city of about one million souls. Before the invasion, Kurds, Turkmens, Arabs and Christians lived together in relative harmony. But the dawning democracy and rich oil fields attract many 'dark hands' from afar. <br>Oil has a firm grip over Kirkuk. Saddam imported thousands of Arabs from the South to control the oil reserves. They took over the houses of Kurds and Turkmen who were forced to flee. But the Arabs are now leaving (some 11.000 Arabs left Kirkuk in 2008). The Kurds conquered the city side by side with the Americans in 2003 and now form the majority. They want Kirkuk to be part of their own autonomous region of Kurdistan, as it once was. But the central government in Baghdad is not letting Kirkuk go. Kirkuk became a disputed area and will not vote in the coming elections at the end of January. <br>Yet, in spite of the political hassle, the Kirkukis still get along. They have intermarried and live in the same streets. The Turkmen green-grocer stands next to his Kurdish colleague at the bazaar where I buy my oranges. But violence has increased since the fall of Saddam. <br>
Kirkuk Kirkuk, daily life in a split city
One of mamy pipelines transporting the oil, south west of Kirkuk, often a target bomb attacks.<br>During nighttime the city has a decor of oil burned orange flume fire.<br>According to the US spokesman are no Americans involved recently in protection of these pipelins
Kirkuk
Youngsters , mainly unemployed, play a local game.<br>this unemployment drives many young people into the hands of radical groups, who find their members in these cafe's<br>Also the fact that many key positions are taken by the Kurds, doesn't make Kurds populair with many Arabic locals and makes it easy for radical groups to find members.
Kirkuk
Members of an anti terror brigade have surrounded a remote village between Kirkuk and Baghdad.<br>their goal is to capture terrorists and get information during a door to door inspection of the village, they enter with the first morninglight.<br>
Kirkuk
Kirkuk center, the amusment park was always the main place for people to go with their children.<br>The fear of attacks force them to stay home, only a few take the risk to play.<br><br>Kirkuk, 200 miles north of Baghdad, lies in the middle of God's sand box. A seemingly endless stream of small hills stretch to her grey and unfinished suburbs. Kirkuk is a city of grey bricks, dusty roads bordered with litter, corrugated iron roofs and low hanging knots of electrical wires. Under this poor and unpromising looking surface lies 13 percent of Iraq's known oil reserves. All the problems of Iraq meet in this city of about one million souls. Before the invasion, Kurds, Turkmens, Arabs and Christians lived together in relative harmony. But the dawning democracy and rich oil fields attract many 'dark hands' from afar. <br>Oil has a firm grip over Kirkuk. Saddam imported thousands of Arabs from the South to control the oil reserves. They took over the houses of Kurds and Turkmen who were forced to flee. But the Arabs are now leaving (some 11.000 Arabs left Kirkuk in 2008). The Kurds conquered the city side by side with the Americans in 2003 and now form the majority. They want Kirkuk to be part of their own autonomous region of Kurdistan, as it once was. But the central government in Baghdad is not letting Kirkuk go. Kirkuk became a disputed area and will not vote in the coming elections at the end of January. <br>Yet, in spite of the political hassle, the Kirkukis still get along. They have intermarried and live in the same streets. The Turkmen green-grocer stands next to his Kurdish colleague at the bazaar where I buy my oranges. But violence has increased since the fall of Saddam. <br>
Kirkuk Kirkuk, daily life in a split city
woman in the market try to find the things they need, since the situation is quit today, people take their change.<br><br>Kirkuk, 200 miles north of Baghdad, lies in the middle of God's sand box. A seemingly endless stream of small hills stretch to her grey and unfinished suburbs. Kirkuk is a city of grey bricks, dusty roads bordered with litter, corrugated iron roofs and low hanging knots of electrical wires. Under this poor and unpromising looking surface lies 13 percent of Iraq's known oil reserves. All the problems of Iraq meet in this city of about one million souls. Before the invasion, Kurds, Turkmens, Arabs and Christians lived together in relative harmony. But the dawning democracy and rich oil fields attract many 'dark hands' from afar. <br>Oil has a firm grip over Kirkuk. Saddam imported thousands of Arabs from the South to control the oil reserves. They took over the houses of Kurds and Turkmen who were forced to flee. But the Arabs are now leaving (some 11.000 Arabs left Kirkuk in 2008). The Kurds conquered the city side by side with the Americans in 2003 and now form the majority. They want Kirkuk to be part of their own autonomous region of Kurdistan, as it once was. But the central government in Baghdad is not letting Kirkuk go. Kirkuk became a disputed area and will not vote in the coming elections at the end of January. <br>Yet, in spite of the political hassle, the Kirkukis still get along. They have intermarried and live in the same streets. The Turkmen green-grocer stands next to his Kurdish colleague at the bazaar where I buy my oranges. But violence has increased since the fall of Saddam. <br>
Kirkuk Kirkuk, daily life in a split city
to Eddy van Wessel Photography website.